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20121129
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on and the fiscal cliff. we have been working on ways to help medicare savings plans and we will address taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today. he has played such a central role over the last several years and he has literally been part of every conversation that has taken place and he is still here. that is a sign of progress. senator durbin has had a long history of being an advocate for the middle class and he has carried that advocacy in the budget negotiations. he was part of the supercommittee. he was in the fiscal gain of eight, every day involved in these issues. -- gang of eight and every gang involved. stands true for the values of the american people and those people who waited in line to vote in people who voted to want a fair shake out of washington. as a champion of that, and i'm excited to have senator durbin here with us. [applause] >> neera, thank you for those kind words. it's good to see you and be here at the center of american progress. thank you for all the work you do. elections, as you say, have consequences and politics is driven by a lot of thin
is basically the entitlement programs, medicare, medicaid, social security, defense spending as well as interest payments. and discretionary part of our budget, which is everything else, cops, justice department, nuclear facilities, education, etc., is a small part of the budget. now, the question is not so much about now, but in the future and the future, medicare spending and medicaid spending in particular and to a degree social security, but much less, will come to consume almost the entire budget. because of the baby boomer retirement wave as well as because of increasing health care costs. and that's why lawmakers and policymakers are working so hard to try to get the fiscal house in order. host: we're talking about the so-called fiscal cliff talks that are happening here in washington. if you want to follow along we're starting a new web page at c-span.org/fiscalcliff. we will have all the related events that we are covering here at c-span as well as a resource page and a twitter feed that follows those reporters who are following the talks and we're learning today and this we
that medicare and medicaid are the main drivers of our deficit. and i know we have seen this morning also several editorial writers indicate the same, that it is important that we put these drivers of the deficit on the table and include them as part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. as the speaker said, we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something that we didn't do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiation. we still believe that it is most important for us to address the economic situation in this country where so many people are out of work. and that's why we take the position and believe strongly that increasing marginal rates is income tax rates is not the way to produce growth and to put people back to work. but we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of this administration to talk about the real problem that we're trying to fix. i'm told that mr. bowles, as some of us will meet with him later today, had said earlier this morning that it's been no serious discussion by the white house on entitlements, on medicare and medicaid. this
said in a speech today that medicare, medicaid should not be part of the fiscal cliff negotiations. should entitlements not be on the table? >> in the meeting i had with the president and the four leaders, president obama said social security is not what we are going to do on this and i agree with him. there are things that i personally think we can do with entitlements that don't hurt beneficiaries. but i'm not going to negotiate with you simply other than to say that we hope they agree to the tax revenue that we're talking about and that is rate increases and as the president said on a number of occasions, we'll be happy to deal with entitlements. >> the congressional wisdom on a fiscal cliff deal does that include receive news and cuts. you made it clear how you feel on revenues. >> we have already done more than $1 billion worth of cuts, so we need to get credit for that in these negotiations that take place. >> senator durbin said he thinks that president obama won't include a deal [inaudible] >> first of all, the debt ceiling. we would be foolish to work out something on stop
, they're entitled to underemployment, foreclosures, cuts in both social security and medicare. poor and middle-class americans know all about the fiscal cliff. they've been getting pushed off it for years. with an unfair tax system, unconscionable trade deals and the fed's monetary policies. nearly 50 million people are in poverty in america. 12 million unemployed. millions more underemployed. on january 2, millions stand to lose unemployment benefits. 14 million americans' mortgages are greater than the value of their homes. on the rise massive cuts to essential services. will the american austerity replace the american dream? we need to turn back from the fiscal cliff with wealth creation, education, job creation, infrastructure rebuilding, monetary reform, trade reform, protection of social security and medicare. we need a great economic revival, not another great depression. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognize next? mr. poe: i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gen
're going to spend a lot of time on defense on medicare, medicaid, all whole bunch of issues. >> they were not divisive issues. >> did you see how close florida was? i think they spent some time defending it. important. we aired several ads. i thought he added some youth and energy. they had a base concerns and he helped those. so i am not criticizing the pick i just think there were other -- >> you are. >> i was giving an assessment of the good and bad. >> was the helpful? he gave them excitement. he bought them silence from conservatives. did that help or hurt mitt romney? >> i do not think it did much of be there. here is the truth. we carried his home town. vice-presidential picks usually help you in their state or they add something to the national ticket. you have to ask governor romney. >> besides the automobile in the midwest, at what other regional issues? >> in iowa and colorado, wind energy tax credit. there was an issue that was important in both of those states. obviously models, jobs, the president jobs plan. and i think taxes. we had a fight where you had the president advoc
no benefits in medicare, -- social security, and medicaid were cut. but, it is now time for congress to get back to the regularly- scheduled programming, and that means jobs. washington has been consumed with averting default, the nation's unemployment problem has been worsening. it is time for jobs to be moved back to the front burner. with the debt reduction package completed, we now have a single- minded focus on jobs for september by removing the threat of default for the next 18 months and by proving both parties can come together to get our deficit under control we have provided certainty to the credit markets. the debt limit agreement largely resolve the budgets for the next two years so the wrangling over spending should be greatly reduced in coming months. we now have a chance to give away from rigid put it away from budget battles to jobs. the jobs issue will not have to play second fiddle to the issue anymore, andhis that is what the american people want. now there will put the political premium on efforts to create jobs as democra. as democrats, that is our high ground. we welco
payments. those are checks sent out to individuals. another 21% goes to medicaid and medicare. those are payments to retired people and indigent people. that is 40% of federal outlays. what that says it is the personnel compensation is not a major issue that is driving up taxes and driving federal expenses in the united states. the federal -- if people believe that taxes are going up because of the problems of excessive compensation in the public sector, there is no evidence of that. there is controversy about the pensions systems being too expensive. if we increase compensation in the federal sector, it will markedly increased taxation. am i getting -- >> do you thing there is a possibility if you decrease funding in the federal budget you would have an increase of reputation among civil servants? >> if they took pay cuts and things like that ? >> pay cuts for full budgets. that could attract more people. >> the -- a reduction in the federal workforce. we can demonstrate that we're trying to be as efficient as we can, and trying to avoid waste and excesses and that can contribute. i
, democrats and republicans, who worked to get medicare through, and that was the time or the country, even if you disagree with somebody, you wanted government to work. right now, we have -- [applause] i know. we have, and it is both democrats and republicans, independents, everybody, there is this feeling of "gotcha." i know something and i am going to do this and it will hurt you. rather than talking about issues and rather than saying, ok, you want this and i want that, can we not find a middle ground? can we not find a way to agree on things and do what we agree on? and we live in a glory time, and we certainly did not -- the attacking that goes on now, the attacking of the families -- that was pretty much generic. it is not very nice now. and i am glad my husband is out of politics. i would not want to be in there now. i do not envy -- one of the things that susan and i have found, and i have found this with julie and the other presidential children -- i think that we have been there. we know what it is like. to some extent, i think we tried to protect each other -- we tried to protec
insurance, medicare, medicaid, supplemental security income for low-income people with disabilities just to top the tip of the iceberg. part of his success in protecting and growing these programs was speaker o'neill's talent in forging political consensus. we have heard that described already. his superb political instincts, and being a pragmatic deal maker which allowed him to take on the day-to-day responsibilities of holding his caucus together while advancing his commitment to liberalism. we have heard the speaker reference speaker o'neill and his popular saying that all politics is local. believe me that was my first advice in coming to this body and it's my advice to this very day that i have taken to heed. he has over -- he had over 50 years of combined public service to both the massachusetts statehouse and our house of representatives. a true public servant in every sense of the word. i'm sure my colleagues will join in a bipartisan round of support for naming of this federal building after come mass p. tip o'neill. i yield back my time to the gentleman from massachusetts, mr.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)